Film Review: Compliance

compliance

Compliance is just about one of the most abhorrent films I’ve ever seen.

In 2007, there were 70 exceptional cases were reported across to the American Police department. While they all had their own, unsettling idiosyncrasies, they were all loosely connected by subterfuge and prank calls. This is no Steve Penk or The Jerky Boys, but real vile cases of human maltreatment.

It’s an extraordinary topic that is crying out to be debunked in an explorative, Errol Morris style documentary. Compliance isn’t that film.

Writer/director Craig Zobel decides to focus this seeming pandemic on one exceptional example, based on a mélange of different real cases to make one mega-horrific fictional one. It’s just another regular day at an Ohio fast food chain, until a meticulous prank caller convinces the restaurant manager (Ann Dowd) that one of her employees Becky, Gossip Girl‘s Dreama Walker, is being accused of stealing from a customer. What proceeds is a manipulating interrogation, where everyone idly agrees to whatever increasingly insane task the caller will have them do. Why? Without proving any of his credentials, the prank caller deceives everyone involved into believing that he is a police officer, and thus establishing his unobjectionable authority. By Compliance‘s nasty end, Becky is naked, humiliated, and sexually violated, and the audience are accomplices; watching on through guarded eyes and clenched fists.

Even though the story comes from a bastardised real place, Zobel really pushes the boundaries of plausibility. Not in a “stranger than fiction” way, but rather because the characterisation, narrative, and Zobel’s misguided compulsion to tell it, is shallow. The ninety minute running time lingers for what feels like days and, whilst the repetitious sequences are relatively tame and implicit, it all feels incredibly ugly and exploitative; as if Zobel is forcing the audience to watch a security camera.

At it’s most tenuous, one could wring-out a slapdash argument that the film is forcing the audience to look at this injustice like a reflexive meta-narrative, like Haneke’s Funny Games. Unlike the unflinchingly austere Austrian, Zobel lacks directorial flare and balls to actually critique or comment on the true events and populace servility to the law.

Even when the film was snapped up at the Sundance Film Festival last year, it was met with notoriety, with walkouts and boos. Later, in a public Q&A, Zobel plainly admitted that the film is misogynistic. But for what reason? Zobel is trying to be forthright and polemical with Compliance, but simply projecting these images isn’t enough to warrant a political license. An artless, meaningless, pseudo-video nasty that doesn’t earn the discomfort it will leave you with.

☆☆☆☆☆ (0 stars)
IMDb

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125: Gates of Heaven (1978)

Don’t worry, Donnatello. We’ll catch that hare and make a wabbit stew.

One minute it’s cheeky muppets, the next it’s full blown animals with legs, arms, and a multitude of functioning body parts.

Known as the “detective director” behind the lens of such important, weighty documentaries as The Thin Blue Line, Standard Operating Procedure and Mr Death, Errol Morris started out with particularly apolitical subjects. Roll on his first feature documentary Gates of Heaven.

Awkwardly tightroping on both sides of the pet cemetery debate, its a piece of work which is both enlightening and entertaining, if a little outmoded and slight by today’s grandiosely proportioned documentary standards, ironically set up by the visionary Morris himself.

All in all, an interesting character study of grief, fragility, and felinity.

★★★☆☆☆
IMDb it.