136: Rubber (2010)

I like those super creative types who keep themselves busy, don’t you? All that ostentatious veneering must get quite tiresome, so it’s impressive to see artists pulling through all the struggle and getting their work out there, irregardless of medium.

But then there’s those jack of all trades, master of none people. Individuals who think that they are so filled with creative juices that they could sell it by the bottle. What dicks.

Rubber is a film directed and written by Quentin Dupieux. Although he hasn’t released a celebrity fragrance (yet), the french style shaper has made quite the name for himself under the musical guise of Mr Oizo. You know him, right? You’ve danced to his music, right? Of course you have. We all have.

Making a great deal of money directing THAT famous Flat Eric/Levi’s commercial, Dupieux has been working with film media for over five years. With this his second feature film, Rubber initially surfaces as a pastiche on horror b-movies, with a particularly bizarro antagonist at its sinister core. But the film also at least attempts to overthrow the very nature of cinema too, asking questions about when is a film just a film? When is it social commentary? When is it absolute tosh? Answer – when it’s called Rubber.

With many elaborate ideas muddled together, it’s unfortunate that none of them really drive home in Rubber. Have a listen to my review right here. I promise it’s not as tyre-some as the film is.

★★☆☆☆☆
IMDb it.

ADMIN –

1) The whole film is currently being streamed for free on YouTube . Go here – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNaEq3mtXUY
2) People who think puns shouldn’t enter into serious film criticism are wrong. Get over it, puns are awesome.

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